subscribe to our newsletter sign up

Early access to super could ‘erode’ asset base

Cash, money, dollars

Allowing early access to superannuation benefits could result in unhappy consequences and lead to future disadvantage for funds’ members, a technical expert has warned.

In light of the government’s consultation on the rules governing the early release of superannuation, NAB director of SMSF and investor behaviour Gemma Dale said that allowing the early release of superannuation for a wider range of circumstances could mean that individuals are disadvantaged in the future.

“The sole purpose test is there to provide for your retirement and so the early access restrictions were originally designed to support you in a scenario where you probably wouldn’t make it to retirement if you didn’t get early access to your super, such as life threatening conditions for example,” she explained.

“I think broadening the range of conditions or circumstances under which funds can be accesses does have the potential to erode that asset base and therefore while you help someone now, they may be circumstantially disadvantaged in the future, and maybe we need to look at alternatives for that.”

Ms Dale said she has seen examples under the current early access rules where individuals have accessed their superannuation and have been left in a worse position because of the ongoing nature of their condition. She also acknowledged the sensitivity and complexities associated with creating legislation that deals with mental health, and the importance of getting it right.

“I spoke to a man who withdrew his superannuation to pay for rehabilitation for his alcoholism, but he didn’t complete the rehabilitation program, and has continued to have a patchy relationship with alcohol since,” she said.

The man who is now in his mid to late 40s now has no superannuation, she said.

“So it didn't have the desired outcome in that it has not resolved the health issue that he had and he now has no superannuation to provide for his retirement, and his health is not going to allow him to work well into his 60s,” she said.

“So I appreciate the difficulty for government in trying to legislate for scenarios like this – it's really hard.”

Early access to super could ‘erode’ asset base
Cash, money, dollars
nestegg logo
subscribe to our newsletter sign up
FROM THE WEB
Recommended by Spike Native Network
Anonymous - Why does this get all the media attention when in reality it affects very few and the charges are minimal? How about reporting on all the ISA TPD.......
Anonymous - This got to be the smartest comment this century ?!....
nan - So what do you do if you are being ripped of and then can't afford the body corporate fees....
MarkL - The banks may not charge dead people any more ........... but they won't charge them any less either!....